Sports Law Roundup – 9/8/2017

aslr

I used to write the sports technology roundup at TechGraphs, an internet website that died, and now I am writing the sports law roundup at ALDLAND, an internet website.

Here are the top sports-related legal stories from the past week:

  • Athlete advisor fraud: In February, Brian J. Ourand, who worked as a financial advisor to athletes, including Mike Tyson and Glen Rice, admitted stealing over $1 million from his clients and pleaded guilty to federal wire fraud charges. On Wednesday, a federal trial judge sentenced Ourand to thirty-three months in prison, less than the thirty-seven months federal prosecutors requested, but more than the year (plus some home confinement) Ourand sought.
  • Radio host ticket fraud: Earlier on Wednesday, FBI agents arrested Craig Carton, who cohosts WFAN’s (New York City) morning sports talk program with former NFL quarterback Boomer Esiason, on fraud charges based on allegations that Carton was operating an event-ticket scam. According to federal prosecutors, Carton induced investors to fund a concert ticket resale venture by claiming that he had special access to purchase the tickets when, in fact, he did not. Carton and an associate instead used the investors’ money for themselves, including to repay casino debts and some initial investors in a Ponzi-style arrangement.
  • Rockets sold: Tilman Fertitta bought the Houston Rockets on Tuesday for $2.2 billion. Fertitta, a Houstonian, is the owner of Landry’s, Inc., a corporation that owns restaurants and other commercial properties including Bubba Gump Shrimp Company, the Golden Nugget casino, and multiple aquariums in Texas, Colorado, and Tennessee, among many other things. Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer set the previous record for the purchase price of an NBA franchise when he bought the Los Angeles Clippers for $2 billion.
  • NFL sanction standards: In light of the ongoing Ezekiel Elliot saga, PFT’s Mike Florio (who, people forget, is a lawyer) penned an essay on the NFL’s low standard of proof used in determining violations of its personal conduct policy, which concludes: “As long as the league has the power to impose discipline based on the very lowest legal standard of proof, any player who finds himself under scrutiny had better be able to show that there is no credible evidence of any kind that could be viewed in any way as suggesting that he has any responsibility for anything that happened.”

Sports court is in recess.

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Sports Law Roundup – 2/10/2017

aslr

I used to write the sports technology roundup at TechGraphs, an internet website that died, and now I am writing the sports law roundup at ALDLAND, an internet website.

Here are the top sports-related legal stories from the past week:

  • Wrestling ban: Last week, the Iranian government announced that it would not allow the American wrestling team to compete in the 2017 Freestyle World Cup, which the Iranian city of Kermanshah is hosting this month, in retaliation for President Trump’s executive order temporarily blocking people from entering the United States from Iran and six other majority-Muslim countries. Now, Iran has lifted that ban, saying it will grant visas to the U.S. wrestlers in light of American judicial orders temporarily halting enforcement of the executive order.
  • Student-athlete scholarships: The NCAA, Pac-12, Big XII, Big Ten, SEC, ACC, AAC, C-USA, MAC, MWC, WAC(!), Sun Belt Conference, and a group of student-athletes settled monetary claims in their antitrust dispute for $208.7 million. The suit targeted caps on athletic scholarships. Under the settlement, the NCAA will pay an average of approximately $7,000 to current and former football and men’s and women’s basketball players who played a sport for four years and were affected by the caps between March 2010 and the present.
  • Football painkillers: In a case we have been watching (here and here) between the NFL’s teams and a group of former players alleging improper dispensation of painkillers, the judge dismissed many of the players’ claims, including all of their claims against twenty-four of the league’s thirty-two teams. At this time, some claims remain pending against the Lions, Vikings, Packers, Raiders, Broncos, Seahawks, Chargers, and Dolphins.
  • Hockey head injuries: Last month, the NHL asked the judge overseeing a head-injury lawsuit between the league and a group of former players to issue an order compelling Boston University’s CTE Center to turn over research documents the former players say constitute evidence supporting their claims. Unsurprisingly, the Center now opposes that request, because disclosing the information would violate the privacy of its research subjects, “impos[e] a burden on the center that will functionally prevent it from conducting any work, and creat[e] a chilling effect on research in this field.”
  • Football head injuries: Former NFL player Brian Urlacher sued a hair-restoration clinic alleging unauthorized use of his likeness in advertisements.
  • Athlete advisor fraud: Brian J. Ourand, who worked as a financial advisor to athletes, including Mike Tyson and Glen Rice, admitted stealing over $1 million from his clients and pleaded guilty to federal wire fraud charges.

Sports court is in recess.